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Los Angeles
Semester

Blog

The Broad

By Jack Marci

March 2019

I’ve spent the past couple months in Los Angeles and, so far, one of my favorite experiences has been when I payed a visit to The Broad. The Broad is a massive public art museum in

downtown Los Angeles filled with three stories of art from around the world. Surprisingly enough, the museum is free to the public which is one of the things I love about this city. It really

says a lot about a place when it puts so much value in arts, sciences, and music, that it funds them and makes them available to anyone. Inside the museum were all sorts of magnificent

exhibits and remarkable paintings that popped off the wall. The largest exhibit in the museum was a dining room set enlarged exactly to scale to be approximately ten times the size of the

average dining room table. I am 6’4 and I was just about as tall as the seat on one of the chairs. People could walk all around the exhibit, including under the table without having to duck.

 

One exhibit that particularly struck me was a room filled with screens, each displaying a room in a house with an instrument. The musicians in the video were entirely aware they were being

filmed and spoke to the director on the screen before their performance. They all played the same song together, each from a different room, then afterwards, went out into a field and drank

together. Then they left and the director walked about each room in the house individually and turned off all of the cameras. The content of the exhibit didn’t resonate with me so much as

understanding what it means for something to be art. The concept of art extends past the canvas. It extends past an individual screen. Art can work together on multiple platforms with

each telling a story of its own in addition to the big picture. My overall experience at The Broad is one that I am very happy to have had. It marks another chapter in my book of exploring the city of

Los Angeles which could never have been completed had I excluded it.